Posts Tagged ‘Weekly Standard’

  • The Rounds: Debt limits, Obamacare crushed our economic recovery, and more on IPAB

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    The debate over raising the debt limit is dominating the news cycle. With a deal near, The Wall Street Journal’s Paul Gigot thinks Obama’s spending cuts aren’t what they appear to be:

    One of President Obama’s advantages in the debt-limit talks has been his ability to sound like a born-again spending cutter in public while the details of what he’s willing to accept remain secret. The reality is that the White House offer on spending reforms was much less than publicly advertised, and by the end it even included $136 billion in new spending proposals over 10 years.

    While spending is the major issue, our continued economic slump isn’t helping our nation’s fiscal matters. Obamacare is now a clear root cause of our economic woes. The Heritage Foundation has released a new study: Economic Recovery Stalled After Obamacare Passed. Just as the economy was on the mend, Obamacare sank it again, the study says, pointing to statistics explaining the unemployment and growth challenges. The Weekly Standard also looks at Obamacare’s effects on the economy and refers to the Heritage study.

    Also in The Weekly Standard, Terry Eastland takes a close look at the legal basis for challenging Obamacare, and the prospects of SCOTUS finding it unconstitutional. There’s hope in the words of Justice Anthony Kennedy:

    Notably, Kennedy’s opinion makes the point that “laws enacted in excess of delegated governmental power” are problematic if they “direct or control” the actions of individuals, for then their “liberty is at stake.” One can expect this and other portions of Bond will be quoted to the Court when it reviews Obamacare.

    [The Bond decision] provides reason to think that Kennedy will see the Obamacare mandate as a law too far—one that exceeds the enumerated powers of Congress, cuts into the authority of the states, and violates individual liberty.

    In Reason, Peter Suderman takes a look at the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) which I’ve discussed. Suderman explores why IPAB is already a mess, unconstitutional, and nearly impossible to repeal. The Goldwater Institute has filed a lawsuit claiming that IPAB is unconstitutional because, according to Diane Cohen of The Goldwater Institute, the organization filing the suit, “Congress cannot delegate away its legislative responsibilities under the Constitution.”

    Congress made repeal of IPAB very difficult as well by setting time limits on introducing repeal legislation and requiring a supermajority to pass it.

    Remember the story that President Obama told repeatedly during the 2008 campaign about how his mother spent her dying months battling with her insurance company because they claimed she suffered from a pre-existing condition? It turns out that the story was fabricated, and Michelle Malkin has the scoop.

    The state-level health insurance exchanges under Obamacare go into effect in 2014, and the Wall Street Journal takes a closer look. Should Republicans refuse to participate in creating exchanges as an act of civil disobedience?

    In an editorial, Investors.com looks at the prototype of Obamacare, former Governor Mitt Romney’s health insurance reform in Massachusetts. In addition to not achieving universal coverage, “…the cumulative cost of RomneyCare is nearly $8.6 billion. The promise of cost-containment has not only been broken, it’s been ripped asunder in spectacular fashion.”

  • The Rounds: Rep. Ryan Exposes Mediscare, Unconventional Wisdom and a Tale of Two States

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    As the 2012 campaign for the White House and Congress heats up, health care has moved to the forefront once again, along with the typical “Mediscare” tactics which I previously discussed. Rep. Paul Ryan, the architect of the GOP’s “Roadmap” budget, rightfully and effectively exposes the latest round of Mediscare attacks, using independent analyses from Politifact, Factcheck, and even the Washington Post’s Fact Checker blog. Read Ryan’s piece here.

    The conventional wisdom, especially after the GOP’s loss in the special election in New York’s 26th district, is that Rep. Ryan’s plan to save Medicare will be a political liability for the GOP in 2012. The Weekly Standard has a different take after looking at polling data and correctly pointing out that “Ryan’s plan would preserve Medicare’s sinking ship, keeping it afloat for future generations.”

    The fact is that Ryan and the GOP are the only ones serious about solving our nation’s looming fiscal disaster and saving Medicare. Even the Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza, while believing this may be a short term political advantage for the Democrats, points out that at least the GOP is serious about proposing plans to save Medicare.

    The problem for Democrats is, if they want to get serious about reforming the entitlement program, they are putting their own necks on the chopping block AND giving up a hugely potent political issue.

    Andrea Tantaros of the New York Daily News has another takeaway from the NY26 special election: The GOP should attack Obamacare more strongly. Rather than spend time defending Rep. Ryan’s “courageous” plan to save Medicare, the GOP must go on the offensive against Obamacare.

    The GOP has a strong case to make, and it should be out there making it. But instead of defending Ryan’s plan, they should be poking holes in Obamacare. Only then will the benefits of their alternative become clear to the American public.

    Read it here.

    On to Obamacare. Ralph R. Reiland of The American Spectator continues to expose the Obamacare waivers handed out to the politically-connected. It helps if you live in Nancy Pelosi’s district.

    I again ask the question: If Obamacare is so great, why the need for any waivers at all?

    What about the prototype for Obamacare? Heartland.org looks at the failure of Romneycare in Massachusetts.

    Taxes, costs, and political interference in medical decisions have all increased, while access to medical care has deteriorated. It’s now apparent Romney did not give Massachusetts universal private health coverage. Instead, he put the state on a glide-path to a single-payer, government monopoly health system—the same path Obamacare now follows at the national level.

    On the rising costs of health care in Massachusetts under Romneycare, Peter Suderman of Reason explores how the state’s explorations in universal, government-mandated care is working out and provides an ominous forecast:

    The Obama administration has explicitly stated on numerous occasions that RomneyCare was the model for the federal overhaul. Given the Bay State’s spiraling costs, it seems more and more likely that, thanks to ObamaCare, we can all expect higher health insurance premiums in our future.

    Finally, last week I looked at California as an example of where America is headed under Obama. Walter Russell Mead has an excellent piece in The American Interest where he concludes California is now a failed state.

    Let there be no mistake: when you produce so many criminals that you can’t afford to lock them up, you are a failed state.  Virtually every important civil institution in society has to fail to get you to this point.  Your homes and houses of worship are failing to build law abiding citizens, much less responsible and informed voters.  Your schools aren’t educating enough of your kids to make an honest living.  Your taxes and policies are so bad that you are driving thousands of businesses away… California used to be the glory of this country, the dream by the sea, the magic state.  Now it produces so many criminals it can’t pay to keep them locked up.

  • The Rounds: Obamacare Birthday Edition

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    Rarely does a law receive so much attention on its first birthday as Obamacare. One year in and the debate over its merits and whether it should be repealed rages unabated.

    The Washington Examiner asks “What a difference a year makes.” In addition to being a big reason why the Democrats lost the house, the Examiner states that:

    Perhaps the most revealing change in the year past, however, is the reaction of the employers who face mandates under Obamacare that impose massive new costs and mountains of red tape. As a result, more than a thousand employers, including Fortune 500 corporations, nonprofits, labor unions and small businesses, have requested and received one-year waivers to buy them some time to figure out how to cope with Obamacare’s demands.

    Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson

    The Weekly Standard looks at how Obamacare is polling now versus a year ago when it was passed. Here’s a hint: It’s bad for Obamacare supporters. One example is a recent Bloomberg poll has repeal support at 52 percent (and the poll respondent mix is heavily skewed to Democrats!).

    In a touching piece in the Wall Street Journal, Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson asks whether his daughter would have survived under Obamacare. His daughter was born with a serious heart defect and he thanks God he and his wife “had the freedom to seek out the most advanced surgical technique. The procedure that saved her, and has given her a chance at a full life, was available because America has a free-market system that has advanced medicine at a phenomenal pace.”

    The defects with the president’s health law are so serious and widespread that the administration has already granted over 1,000 waivers to protect businesses, labor unions and other organizations from its most onerous provisions. We need to recognize that the finest health-care system in the world is at risk—and repeal ObamaCare before it’s too late.

    Hear hear! Here’s hoping Obamacare don’t live to see birthday #2!

    Photo Credit: Mike Roemer